I Love My Fingers by Kayte Deioma AKA Auntie Kayte

These are my fingers and they are part of me.
I love my fingers, and my fingers love me.

These are my hands and they are part of me.
I love my hands, and my hands love me.

These are my arms and they are part of me.
I love my arms, and my arms love me.

These are my elbows and they are part of me.
I love my elbows, and my elbows love me.

These are my shoulders and they are part of me.
I love my shoulders, and my shoulders love me.

This is my head and it is part of me.
I love my head, and my head loves me.

These are my eyes and they are part of me.
I love my eyes, and my eyes love me.

This is my nose and it is part of me.
I love my nose, and my nose loves me.

This is my mouth and it is part of me.
I love my mouth, and my mouth loves me.

These are my ears and they are part of me.
I love my ears, and my ears love me.

These are my legs and they are part of me.
I love my legs, and my legs love me.

These are my knees and they are part of me.
I love my knees, and my knees love me.

These are my feet and they are part of me.
I love my feet, and my feet love me.

These are my toes and they are part of me.
I love my toes, and my toes love me.

I Love My Fingers Teaching Notes

Most of us grow up disliking different parts of our bodies and it can start at a very young age, especially when children observe their parents, older siblings or other role models being disparaging of their own body parts. Whether you're wishing for longer legs, thinner hips or a smaller nose, kids absorb this idea of being unsatisfied with the body you have, and comparing yourself unfavorably to others, always wanting something different.

Teaching children to love themselves and their bodies can start with their first words. Kids are awesome at loving themselves, from their fascination with their toes, to embracing their own image in a mirror. I Love My Fingers is a great tool for both teaching the names of body parts and instilling appreciation for exactly the body you have - yes, sing it with them to learn appreciate your own body parts and let go of self-criticism.

When I sing this song with verbal kids, I let them guide which order we sing the body parts and which body parts we include. There's no right or wrong order and you're not limited to this list.

When you're teaching kids about stranger danger and inappropriate touch, you can also use a variation on this song as another tool to teach children that they are in charge of their own body. You can do this by changing the first line to "These are my fingers, and they belong to me," and incorporating private parts into the song, or at least into the conversation about the song.